Finding the Perfect Pair of Dance Shoes for Your Ballroom Lessons


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Unquestionably, ballroom dancers of all levels experience a love-hate relationship with their dance shoes. While the right pair can make you feel like you can fly, the wrong pair can send you crashing back to reality. Especially susceptible to the new shoes blues, dancers can spend copious amounts of time searching for the perfect fit. Blood, sweat and tears are shed trying to break the molds of ill-fitting dance shoes to our calloused feet.

Whether you’re wearing them to a private lesson, ballroom workshop, dance practice, ballroom competition or an all night social dance party, your shoes should feel as good as your home slippers. If they don’t, you’ve yet to find your perfect fit. But the seemingly elusive perfect fit does exist and fortunately, Briora’s dance instructors are more than willing to help you find it!

With the increasing number of quality brands and vendors available (International, Supadance, Ray Rose, AIDA, DSI, Capezio, Star and many more), it’s easy to get overwhelmed. Everyone has his or her own preference, because everyone’s feet are different! Here are some of my tips—gathered from wearing down hundreds of shoes over my 16 years of dancing—to aid in your journey.


Each brand of dance shoes has slightly different sizing specifications. It’s especially important to pay attention to sizing charts and conversions when ordering ballroom shoes online and from different countries. European and U.K. sizing is different from U.S. sizing, and more often than not, the size of your dance shoes will not match the size of your regular shoes. That’s perfectly normal!

A great rule of thumb for ladies is to order Standard or Smooth dance shoes in at least a half-size larger and Latin dance shoes in at least a half-size smaller. Whenever you are dealing with close-toed shoes, you must take care to leave room for your toes, especially since Standard and Smooth dance shoes taper off to a point. When it comes to open-toed shoes, it often helps to have your toes spill over the edge of the dance shoe, giving you more freedom to grip the floor as you tackle your Cha-Cha or Rumba walks.

For gentlemen, the task is easier. Because men’s shoes are not as stiff as ladies shoes, they are inherently more flexible, and more likely to mold to your foot shape. No need to deviate from your standard shoe size to feel comfortable doing a perfect Foxtrot feather step.

Heel Size

Another great rule of thumb for ladies (unless there is a big height gap between you and your partner) addresses heel size. For Standard and Smooth shoes, I suggest getting a lower heel (2 inches is my ideal), and for Latin shoes a higher one (3 inches works for me).

A lower heel for Standard and Smooth styles facilitates natural swing action, whereas a higher heel may restrict you from being able to soften into your ankles with ease. You want your weight to move freely from your toes to your heels, and higher heels tend to focus your weight on your toes.

In Latin, the higher heel is actually a benefit, helping you place your weight over the balls of your feet, allowing for more nimble, speedy footwork. Not to mention, it’s much easier to point your toes! As always, ask your dance instructor for advice before picking a heel height—they know what your dancing needs and what shoe will work with you instead of against you.

The aforementioned rule also applies to gentlemen—a very low heel is preferred for Standard and Smooth styles, whereas a higher heel is appropriate for Latin. Next time you browse through dance shoes, pay attention to the heel shape—it tends to be square for Standard and Smooth shoes, but more triangular for Latin.

Straps for Ladies

When it comes to Standard shoes, I’ve always preferred having a strap holding my shoe together, as opposed to a plastic band or no strap at all. For me, the strap provides a sense of security, and helps me distribute my weight equally over the entirety of my foot. Plus, I never have to worry about my shoes falling off during my dance lessons or, even worse, at ballroom competitions.

In the case of Latin dance shoes, I’ve always preferred T-straps to ankle straps. Not only do my feet feel more secure with the T-strap protecting against wobbly ankles, but I have more power to direct weight distribution over my foot. If you move the vertical strap towards the inside of your foot, for example, your weight will follow. Ankle straps, while less stable, allow your foot to be more flexible, often resulting in a more beautiful pointed foot. Take the time to experiment with both and ask your dance teacher which style best suits your feet.

Where to Look

If you’re a competitive ballroom dancer, competitions are great opportunities to try on and experiment with many different brands and styles of shoes from attending vendors. If you don’t frequent competitions, you can order shoes online, directly from each vendor. Often times, you can find lightly worn or brand new shoes on Ebay from more high-end brands (like International or Ray Rose) at drastically reduced rates.

You can also visit local dance shops, like Star Dance Shop in Lynwood, which carries many brands and also puts in special orders. Briora has a great stock of Smooth, Ballroom, Latin and practice shoes for both men and women, so you can try a pair on and test them on our floor during your dance lesson. Just visit our dance shop, which carries Capezio and Star brands, or ask our receptionist for help. While we carry several sizes, we can also put in a special order if your size is unavailable.

 Practice vs. Competition

Once you’ve found the perfect pair of dance shoes, make sure to buy two pairs. Dedicate one pair for your practice and one pair for dance competitions or special occasions, like weddings or parties. You know how they fit, so there will be no surprises. If you’re a competitive dancer, practice and take dance lessons in your competition shoes the week leading up to the event to break them in. After the first time, dedicate them only to competitions—dirty shoes distract the judges from your dancing (and are often a pet peeve!).

As is always the case, practice makes perfect when looking for dance shoes. So, if your first pair is especially incompatible with your feet, don’t despair. Follow these tips, talk to your instructors, and keep trying!

Create Yourself With Dance


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Many of us spend our whole lives trying to “find ourselves.” We go on a grand search to chip away at some elusive barrier that is magically preventing us from understanding our identity and life’s purpose. We travel the world, we pick up new hobbies, we hunger, and we try to lose ourselves to find ourselves. But this search doesn’t always have to manifest itself in outward action—even if we’re not struggling to find ourselves, our friends and family are, and we are infected with that lingering state of mind.

Unfortunately, many of us take this state of mind with us on the dance floor. I know I do. And it doesn’t matter if we’re competitive or social dancers, whether we turn to dance for expression or exercise. So many of us come to a standstill when we try to “find” the dancer we should be. We search for certain feelings, actions and sensations—waiting for them to come to us and feeling utterly hopeless when they fall outside of our mental and physical grasp.

But instead of trying to “find yourself,” focus your whole life on creating yourself. Use dance as a tool to build yourself up, to explore self-realization and growth. When it comes to the dance floor, be ambitious about the dancer you’d like to become and stop scapegoating the required effort onto mysterious externalities.

Instead of relying on your teacher, dance partner, or coach to shape you into a good dancer, realize that your mind is the key to achieving that goal. At any level, consider the following:

Become Aware of Your Motivations for Pursuing Dance

Allow yourself to self-reflect, to understand why you are drawn to dance. Often, these motivations reveal much about all of our endeavors, and can in turn help us understand what type of dancers (and people) we want to become.

Do you love ballroom because you enjoy socializing and dancing with others? Are you trying to conquer the samba in order to lose a couple of inches off your waist? To improve your health? Are you passionate about performing in front of others? Be conscious, always.

Set Weekly Goals

Once you understand your motivations, construct and set attainable, weekly goals for yourself. By the end of this week I want to feel confident dancing my silver tango routine. Or at the Friday party I want to dance with at least 4 different partners. Or, even more simply: I want to do the best natural turn at the end of my next private lesson.

By deliberately identifying areas for improvement, and pacing yourself to select goals that are reasonable but not overwhelming, you set yourself up for success. Conquering one small goal a week positively reinforces your commitment and state of mind.

Make sure to share these goals with your teachers, so that they can help you succeed. Still, exercise self-reliance and don’t become passive, depending on your teachers to conquer those goals for you. We rely on our teachers to tell us what we’re good at without identifying those strengths ourselves or understanding what we’d like to excel at. Seek their advice, wisdom, and experience but remember that your body and mind have to do the work.

Self-Attribute Both Success and Failure

In our everyday lives, many of us choose to attribute successes to our hard work, our ambition, our perseverance. When it comes to failures, on the other hand, we sometimes choose to shrug off personal responsibility, ascribing unsuccessful endeavors to forces beyond our control. The rest of us, those who are self-critical, do the opposite.

Bringing either of these attitudes with you to the dance floor is toxic. In dance, you must train your mind to understand that both your successes and failures should be self-attributed.

When dancing with a partner, frustration comes easy, and blame is often thrown on the actions of the other person. Of course I couldn’t get through the entire quickstep, you were pushing me the whole time! Or, on the other side of the spectrum, we think ‘of course that Cha-Cha was great, my teacher knows what they’re doing.’

In both these scenarios, you are passing off your responsibility to the hands of others, allowing them to dictate your success. Instead, focus your introspection on what you did to contribute to the success of a figure, routine, or performance. Likewise, consider how you may have contributed to a failure—in ballroom, there can never be only one person at fault.

Make Room for Inspiration

Watch dancers that are better than you. Maybe it’s a social dancer who makes leading look effortless or a competitive dancer who has perfect rumba walks. Rather than letting their excellence overwhelm you, allow room for inspiration to blossom.

Identify what you like about their dancing or attitude, and consider whether those factors align with your own motivations and goals. Don’t expect to “find yourself” in their dancing, but rather talk to your teachers or partner about what steps you can take to reach that level of excellence for yourself.

What to Pack for Your Next Ballroom Dance Competition – Part 2!


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Here is our next installment in this series – What to pack for men!cuff links

  • Costumes ( suit, jacket, cuff links, pants, tie, pocket square)
  • Suit/Tux if you are staying for dinner aside from dancing
  • Performance Shoes, socks
  • Practice Wear, if desired
  • Practice and/or Backup Shoes
  • Shoe Brush
  • Music for solo performances if applicable
  • Daytime clothing. Dressy casual/business casual is recommended
  • Hair supplies (gel, hairspray, comb, etc.)
  • Razor and Shaving Cream
  • Toiletries and other personal items
  • Bandaids, shoe glue, safety pins, and $50 cash for emergencies
  • Snacks for in between heats

What to Pack for Your Next Ballroom Dance Competition!


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Be prepared and you won’t have to worry! All of the items may not apply to you, this is just a general list.

Today’s theme is costumes and accessories for women!

  • Ballgowns, and/or Latin Dresses
  • Nylons or fishnet stockings – bring an extra pair, just in case!
  • Performance Shoes
  • Practice and/or Backup Shoes
  • Shoe Brush
  • Heel Protectors, Shoe Elastics, Shoe Brush, and other Shoe Accessories (if applicable)
  • Makeup
  • Jewelry: Earrings, Bracelets, Necklaces, Hair Accessories, etc.
  • Toiletries and other personal items
  • Practice wear
  • Daytime clothing. Dressy casual/business casual is recommended
  • Band-Aids
  • Safety pins or sewing kit
  • Make sure you have your teacher’s phone number in case of emergencies
  • Snacks for in between heats

Stay tuned for our next installment in this series – What to pack for men!

How to Become a Confident Social Dancer

Social dancing is a great way to meet new people, get exercise, and have fun!

Getting Started

The best approach to beginning social dancing is to join a group class in your style of interest. Check out Briora’s events calendar for a list of the classes we offer.

It is a good idea to start with our Introduction to Ballroom Dance Series, or a any class in the American style at the beginning level. This will give you a basic foundation for social dancing.

Group Classes versus Private Lessons

Learning to dance as a group can be stimulating, challenging, and lots of fun! Group lessons are inexpensive and a great way to try out a variety of dances and meet new people.

If you wish to learn a few basic steps before joining a group class, private lessons are the best way to see the studio, learn about our programs, and decide which classes are right for you. It is a good idea to supplement group lessons with regular private lessons, since private lessons are tailored to you and your learning style and make the process of becoming a confident social dancer faster and easier.

Partner versus No Partner

Having a practice partner is helpful – and if you do not already have a regular partner, attending group classes and parties is the best way to meet one.  If you do have a regular partner, we recommend that you take a combination of group classes and private lessons–both together as a couple, and one-on-one with your instructor.

Practice Makes Perfect

The more regularly you attend our classes and parties, the more practice you will get, and the more people you will meet. Soon you’ll be twirling around the floor like a pro!

Social dancing is a great way to get exercise, have fun, and meet new people!

Social dancing is a great way to get exercise, have fun, and meet new people!

Health Benefits of Ballroom Dancing


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Did you know…
Not only is ballroom dancing lots of fun, but it is also great for your health!

Mental Benefits:

Any style of dancing can help to improve your mental acuity by requiring you to make split-second rapid-fire decisions. When moving from one step to the next, or recovering from an unfortunate mis-step, your brain must make an instant decision to keep your movement fluid. With this action, dancing is stimulating the connectivity of your brain by generating the need for new neural pathways.  Challenging or advanced classes are even better for you, as they will create a greater need for new neural pathways.

Physical Benefits:

Flexibility! Most forms of dance require dancers to perform moves that require bending and stretching, so dancers naturally become more flexible simply by dancing. If that isn’t enough of a stretch for you, Briora Ballroom also offers several fitness classes, such as yoga and Essentrics, design to increase strength and flexibility.

Regular dancing is also great for improving endurance and overall health. Elevating the heart rate through vigorous ballroom dancing can increase stamina. Just as in any form of exercise, regular dancing will build endurance. Briora’s hour-long dance classes will be sure to increase your mobility and keep your heart pumping!

Improved Sense of Well Being

In addition to its many mental and physical benefits, ballroom group classes are a great way to meet other people. Joining a dance class can increase self-confidence and build social skills. Because physical activity reduces stress and tension, regular dancing gives an overall sense of well-being.

Best of all, dancing burns calories and can assist in weight loss!

Ready to dance your way to fitness? Please visit for more information on our studio and class offerings!




Briora’s New Logo

Slava and I are excited to share BrioraTM Ballroom Dance Studio’s new logo! A modern take on a classic motif, two dancers’ bodies form the shape of the Briora “B”. The design was hand drawn and is completely unique. The graceful script that follows was handwritten with a feather. The logo was designed by Slava’s cousin, Aleksandrina Stefanova, a talented Bulgarian artist and designer. I fell in love with the design at first sight – for me, the logo has a pizzazz that perfectly captures the Briora brand: fun, unique & elegant. We hope you will love it too! Stay tuned for more updates as we countdown to the opening of Briora Ballroom Dance Studio!

Briora Ballroom Dance Studio’s Logo

Artist & Designer Aleksandrina Stefanova sketched the Briora “B” by hand.

For more images of the design process see Aleksandrina’s gallery at

Introducing Briora Ballroom’s Design Inspiration

A Ballroom Dance Studio should be an escape from daily life – elegant, spacious, light-filled, and full of fun and friends. We are excited to introduce the design concept for Briora™ Ballroom Dance Studio. Briora’s interior design and décor are inspired by our Cultural Memories of Ballroom Dance.

Our cultural memories of ballroom dance include Fred and Ginger dancing the night away in an elegant Art Deco ballroom, Prince Charming sweeping Cinderella off her feet, the glitz and glamour of Dancing with the Stars, and perhaps our parents and grandparents dancing at happy gatherings of family and friends.

To reflect this inspiration, we have chosen Art Deco inspired tile in homage to the era of great Hollywood dancers; elegant chandeliers recall the grand ballrooms of Europe; and warm, spicy colors echo the fun and passion of tango, cha cha and the other Latin-American dances.  We can’t wait to share it with you, and hope you will feel welcomed and inspired each time you walk into our beautiful ballroom dance studio!

Samples of tile, paint colors, and wall coverings for Briora Ballroom Dance Studio

Briora Ballroom Dance Studio provides dance instruction tailored to you so you can have fun dancing!  Opening Summer 2012 in Redmond.

What’s In A Name?

Shakespeare famously said a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.  Even so, we wanted to make sure we chose just the right name for our new ballroom dance studio.  We are excited to introduce our new name, Briora™.  Briora is inspired by the Italian word “brio”, meaning vigor, vivacity, energy, and enthusiasm.   We believe it encapsulates the fun, confidence, joy and togetherness of ballroom dancing. 

Now we are working on designing a fabulous logo and website to match.  Stay tuned for more updates as we countdown to our studio opening in Redmond, WA this summer!